September 16, 2014

Consequence of Infinitely Discursive Vision Technologies (2014)
A Site Specific Installation @ Fridman Gallery August 28 - Sept 4, 2014
Materials: Neon, 3 channel Video w/ Audio, Projectors, Flatscreen TV, Media Players, Wire, Audio Amplifier, Speakers

August 28, 2014
Thursday Reading: Breaking Things on Purpose by Doug Bierend
On Glitch Art and the work of Sabato Visconti
(image by Visconti)
Notes:
There’s a whole breed of artist out there, who are not only concerned with using tools, but with their making as an integral practice of critical engagement with the material and conceptual content of their process and work. Tool making is necessarily social and political in its scope.
Glitch Art generated through algorithmic means is a bit like a painter experimenting with the application of paint on the canvas. The canvas is taken as default, the paint is taken as default, but the process of application and its results are of primary concern. The image is default, the fact that it is simply a matrix of color values is taken as default, the algorithms are selected or crafted as processes which “push pixels” around the screen. Where this variant of glitch art departs from its edgier cousins is in its lack of critical engagement with the materials underlying or informing the conditions necessary for digital images in the first place.
A good example of a deeper glitch oriented practice can be found in the work of Kim Asendorf. Though not strictly a glitch artist, Asendorf engages with the materials, practices, and concepts of glitch art quite broadly in his work. His exploration of pixel sorting touches upon the evocation of error and the surface characteristics of visual glitches which happens, paradoxically, as a consequence of ordering all the pixels according to their numeric value. This form of pixel pushing, deals with the image as a matrix of pixels, touching upon our perception of the image as such, revealing the arbitrary nature in which images can be conveyed through a screen.
In Extra File, Asendorf takes up the task of writing his own file formats and image compression schemes. The result is not only a new family of formats for shrinking and sharing images, but a collection of artifacts waiting to be discovered and explored, accessible through data bending or otherwise manipulating, or corrupting the image data.
One step further: something I would like to add to my wishlist is a image viewing application which allows for the real-time interpretation of mis-compiled image rendering algorithms. It’s one thing to bust a JPG, and a whole other to bust the algorithm used to render the JPG. Evidence of the potential for tweaking with rendering algorithms can be found in Nick Briz’s Glitch Codec Tutorial. Though it deals with re-writing and compiling the source code for video algorithms, the same basic idea should be applicable to just about any media.

Thursday Reading: Breaking Things on Purpose by Doug Bierend

On Glitch Art and the work of Sabato Visconti

(image by Visconti)

Notes:

There’s a whole breed of artist out there, who are not only concerned with using tools, but with their making as an integral practice of critical engagement with the material and conceptual content of their process and work. Tool making is necessarily social and political in its scope.

Glitch Art generated through algorithmic means is a bit like a painter experimenting with the application of paint on the canvas. The canvas is taken as default, the paint is taken as default, but the process of application and its results are of primary concern. The image is default, the fact that it is simply a matrix of color values is taken as default, the algorithms are selected or crafted as processes which “push pixels” around the screen. Where this variant of glitch art departs from its edgier cousins is in its lack of critical engagement with the materials underlying or informing the conditions necessary for digital images in the first place.

A good example of a deeper glitch oriented practice can be found in the work of Kim Asendorf. Though not strictly a glitch artist, Asendorf engages with the materials, practices, and concepts of glitch art quite broadly in his work. His exploration of pixel sorting touches upon the evocation of error and the surface characteristics of visual glitches which happens, paradoxically, as a consequence of ordering all the pixels according to their numeric value. This form of pixel pushing, deals with the image as a matrix of pixels, touching upon our perception of the image as such, revealing the arbitrary nature in which images can be conveyed through a screen.

In Extra File, Asendorf takes up the task of writing his own file formats and image compression schemes. The result is not only a new family of formats for shrinking and sharing images, but a collection of artifacts waiting to be discovered and explored, accessible through data bending or otherwise manipulating, or corrupting the image data.

One step further: something I would like to add to my wishlist is a image viewing application which allows for the real-time interpretation of mis-compiled image rendering algorithms. It’s one thing to bust a JPG, and a whole other to bust the algorithm used to render the JPG. Evidence of the potential for tweaking with rendering algorithms can be found in Nick Briz’s Glitch Codec Tutorial. Though it deals with re-writing and compiling the source code for video algorithms, the same basic idea should be applicable to just about any media.

August 27, 2014
Exhibition Alert:
August 28th - Sept 4th @ Fridman Gallery
LANDSCAPE WITH DEVICES
Noa Dolberg Esther Ruiz Phillip Stearns
Opening Reception:Thursday, August 28, 6-8pm

Closing Reception:Thursday, September 4, 6-8pm

Exhibition Alert:

August 28th - Sept 4th @ Fridman Gallery

LANDSCAPE WITH DEVICES

Noa Dolberg
Esther Ruiz
Phillip Stearns

Opening Reception:Thursday, August 28, 6-8pm

Closing Reception:Thursday, September 4, 6-8pm

August 26, 2014
Sun is Always Setting/Rising Somewhere

Sun is Always Setting/Rising Somewhere

August 12, 2014

Sudoku puzzle solution used as a template for weaving patterns. All possible combinations which produce a valid binding structure are animated here sequentially according to number of sunk warp threads.

July 28, 2014

Phillip Stearns

Hito Steyerl: Is the Internet úäCì@?ù.1HcpiÙîfê¿Dead, 2014 (Unglitched), 2014

Text, which Hito Steyerl inserted into the data of an image of a print by Utamaro, was manually found and deleted, restoring the original digital file.

Source

More Origins

July 3, 2014
Shifting

Shifting

May 29, 2014

MS Word for Mas OSX No.1

Designed by Phillip Stearns for Glitch Textiles

May 29, 2014

Mac OSX DYLD No. 12

Designed by Phillip Stearns for Glitch Textiles

May 8, 2014

Glitched Gradient 001_012_014

By Phillip Stearns of Glitch Textiles

May 8, 2014

Glitch Gradient 002_035_088

By Phillip Stearns of Glitch Textiles

May 2, 2014
I was asking Hank Rudolph at @SignalCulture (I’m doing a residency there right now!) about converting between audio and video directly so I could setup feedback loops. After setting up a microphone and goofing around trying to colorize it, Hank decided to try to patch raw oscillator signals into a Time Base Corrector. I’ve spent the last 3 hours torturing the TBCs by feeding them back into each other through an audio mixer. Here’s a taste of the output (no audio).

I was asking Hank Rudolph at @SignalCulture (I’m doing a residency there right now!) about converting between audio and video directly so I could setup feedback loops. After setting up a microphone and goofing around trying to colorize it, Hank decided to try to patch raw oscillator signals into a Time Base Corrector. I’ve spent the last 3 hours torturing the TBCs by feeding them back into each other through an audio mixer. Here’s a taste of the output (no audio).

April 29, 2014

New Woven Throw Design for 2014:

007_243_244

From Find and Replace Studies 2014

Designed by Phillip Stearns of Glitch Textiles

April 29, 2014

New Woven Throw Design for 2014:

006_253_255

From Find and Replace Studies 2014

Designed by Phillip Stearns of Glitch Textiles

April 22, 2014

Canyons of flesh, masks of the interior, portraits of fluid geometries, a mathematics of resemblances.

Photographs from my wanderings around the interiors or various portraits found in the 123D Catch community projects.